marketing power point presentation

MY PRODUCT IS THE TOYOTA SIENNA.

 

Marketing Plan Term Project Requirements

You will probably have to look for more sources as you begin to write. Your sources will be most useful in Part 1, where you are analyzing the current situation. Research will be incorporated throughout your presentation and need not be submitted separately.

Look for academic sources that use a review or editing process. This means that, although you will be using the company’s website, it should only provide background on the product; it should not be the primary source for your analysis. Most of your information will come from databases (e.g., Hoover’s), popular business publications (e.g., the Wall Street Journal, Business Week, industry trade journals), and government data (e.g., census data and trends).

You can use the UMUC virtual library in your online classroom. If you need help finding information, be sure to contact a virtual librarian or ask your faculty member for help.

A.  Current Marketing Situation

     1.  Market description

    1. Segmentation (describe target market using segmentation characteristics)
    2. Marketing targeting strategy
    3. Value proposition
    4. Factors influencing consumer behavior of the primary target market
    5. Buyer decision process of the primary target market

     2. Product review

    1. Levels of product/service
    2. Type of product/service
    3. Product/service life cycle
    4. Benefits/features analysis
    5. Differentiation
    6. Branding strategy

      3. Competitive review

    1. Competitive analysis
    2. Market share
    3. Competitive positions and roles
    4. Strategic sweet spot
    5. Positioning
  1. Distribution review
    1. Current supply chain members and roles
    2. Value-delivery network analysis
    3. Current type of distribution strategy

B.  Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats Analysis (SWOT)

  1. Microenvironments
  2. Macroenvironments

Length. Minimally, you should have at least one slide per topic, plus your title page and source page(s). General length guidelines are:

     Part 1:  Approximately 25-30 slides

All information should be contained on the slide itself. Do not use the ‘notes’ section of the slide.

Reference numbers. Include the reference numbers noted in the outline for both Part 1 and Part 2 on your slides (e.g., A.1.a; A.1.b; A.1.c, and so forth).  

Professionalism. Be sure to refer to the PowerPoint Presentation Tips under Course Content, Marketing Toolbox, to ensure that you submit a professional product. This will be part of your grade for both Part 1 and Part 2.

Citations and Bibliography. Use an acceptable style guide (e.g., APA or MLA) for citations. See UMUC’s library website for useful citation tools.

Submit for grading. Save your PowerPoint presentation file as a .ppp file and upload it to your Assignment Dropbox by the due date specified in the course schedule for Part 1 r submit your completed project in class on the meeting date noted in your course schedule.

Overview of Grading Rubric for Marketing Plan Term Project, Part 1

Content

Points

A. Current Marketing Situation (65 points)

   1. Market description

20

   2. Product review

20

   3. Competitive review

20

   4. Distribution review

5

B. SWOT Analysis

20

Overall presentation/use of academic research

   15

TOTAL

100

Detailed Grading Criteria for Marketing Plan Term Project, Part 1

A.  Current Marketing Situation (65 points maximum)

1.  Market description (Section A.1, a–e) (20 points maximum)

  1. Segmentation
  2. Marketing targeting strategy
  3. Value proposition
  4. Factors influencing consumer’s behavior
  5. Buyer decision process

Points Awarded

Assessment Criteria

18–20

Student demonstrates superior understanding of the marketing concepts and can apply them to the product/service scenario. Represents A-level work.

16–17

Student demonstrates good understanding of the marketing concepts and can generally apply them to the product/service scenario; may have a weak analysis of one or two of the concepts. Represents B-level work.

14–15

Student demonstrates an average understanding of the marketing concepts, may not be able to apply them in all instances, or offers analysis that is inconsistent or too generalized. Represents C-level work.

12–13

Student demonstrates a poor understanding of the marketing concepts or misses some of the concepts, relies too heavily on text language, cannot apply concepts to the product/service situation. Represents D-level work.

0–11

Student does not demonstrate an understanding of the marketing concepts. Represents failing work.

 2.  Product review (Section A.2, a–f) (20 points maximum)

  1. Levels of product/service
  2. Type of product/service
  3. Product/service life cycle
  4. Benefits/features analysis
  5. Differentiation
  6. Branding

Points Awarded

Assessment Criteria

18–20

Student demonstrates superior understanding of the marketing concepts and can apply them to the product/service scenario. Represents A-level work.

16–17

Student demonstrates good understanding of the marketing concepts and can generally apply them to the product/service scenario; may have a weak analysis of one or two of the concepts. Represents B-level work.

14–15

Student demonstrates an average understanding of the marketing concepts, may not be able to apply them in all instances, or offers analysis that is inconsistent or too generalized. Represents C-level work.

12–13

Student demonstrates a poor understanding of the marketing concepts or misses some of the concepts, relies too heavily on text language, cannot apply concepts to the product/service situation. Represents D-level work.

0–11

Student does not demonstrate an understanding of the marketing concepts. Represents failing work.

 3. Competitive review (Section A.3, a–e) (20 points maximum)

  1. Competitor analysis
  2. Market share
  3. Competitive positions and roles
  4. Strategic sweet spot
  5. Positioning

Points Awarded

Assessment Criteria

18–20

Student demonstrates superior understanding of the marketing concepts and can apply them to the product/service scenario. Represents A-level work.

16–17

Student demonstrates good understanding of the marketing concepts and can generally apply them to the product/service scenario; may have a weak analysis of one or two of the concepts. Represents B-level work.

14–15

Student demonstrates an average understanding of the marketing concepts, may not be able to apply them in all instances, or offers analysis that is inconsistent or too generalized. Represents C-level work.

12–13

Student demonstrates a poor understanding of the marketing concepts or misses some of the concepts, relies too heavily on text language, cannot apply concepts to the product/service situation. Represents D-level work.

0–11

Student does not demonstrate an understanding of the marketing concepts. Represents failing work.

4. Distribution review (Section A.4, a–c) (5 points maximum)

  1.  
    1. Current supply chain members and roles
    2. Value-delivery network analysis
    3. Current type of distribution strategy

Points Awarded

Assessment Criteria

5

Student demonstrates superior understanding of the marketing concepts and can apply them to the product/service scenario. Represents A-level work.

4

Student demonstrates good understanding of the marketing concepts and can generally apply them to the product/service scenario; may have a weak analysis of one or two of the concepts. Represents B-level work.

3

Student demonstrates an average understanding of the marketing concepts, may not be able to apply them in all instances, or offers analysis that is inconsistent or too generalized. Represents C-level work.

2

Student demonstrates a poor understanding of the marketing concepts or misses most of the concepts, relies too heavily on text language, cannot apply concepts to the product/service scenario. Represents D-level work.

0–1

Student does not demonstrate an understanding of the marketing concepts. A section is missing or incomplete. Represents failing work.

 B.  Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT Analysis) (20 points maximum)

  1. Microenvironments
  2. Macroenvironments

Points Awarded

Assessment Criteria

18–20

Student demonstrates superior understanding of the marketing concepts and can apply them to the product/service scenario. Thoroughly understands how the concepts can be translated into a SWOT analysis. Represents A-level work.

16–17

Student demonstrates good understanding of the marketing concepts and can generally apply them to the product/service scenario; may have a weak SWOT analysis of one or two of the concepts. Represents B-level work.

14–15

Student demonstrates an average understanding of the marketing concepts, may not be able to apply them to a SWOT analysis in all instances, or offers a SWOT analysis that is inconsistent or too generalized. Represents C-level work.

12–13

Student demonstrates a poor understanding of the marketing concepts, misses some of the concepts, relies too heavily on text language, and cannot apply concepts to the product/service scenario. Represents D-level work.

0–11

Student does not demonstrate an understanding of the marketing concepts. Represents failing work.

 Grammar, composition, use of external research sources, and overall presentation
(15 points maximum)

oints Awarded

Assessment Criteria

14–15

Student submits a professional presentation, relies on external research to support analysis, and minimizes use of personal opinion. Presentation is free of typos and grammatical errors. References are academic sources and are formatted as specified in an acceptable college-level style guide.

12–13

Student submits a professional presentation, relies equally on external research and unsubstantiated personal opinion. Presentation may contain a few typos and grammatical errors. References are mostly academic sources and are formatted as specified in an acceptable college-level style guide.

10–11

Student submits a basic presentation; relies mostly on personal opinion or product website for information. Presentation may have some formatting issues or overreliance on artwork over substantive analysis; may have some typos and grammatical errors. Cites few references, but follows an acceptable college-level style guide.

9

Student submits a presentation that is severely lacking in professionalism. Inconsistent formatting making it difficult to follow; contains numerous typos or grammatical errors. No references cited or used; relies solely on personal opinion and product website for information.

0–8

Student submits a presentation that is clearly deficient, does not meet the project requirements, is difficult to read and follow, contains only a partial analysis with several sections missing, or otherwise demonstrates a failing performance.

Attachments

 


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